Insurance

What is a Deductible?

Deductible

[dih-duhk-tuh-buh l]

noun

1.

A Deductible is the amount of money a policyholder must pay out of pocket before any insurance payments are made. For example, if repairs to a personal vehicle cost $1,000, but the Deductible on that Policy is $500, the policyholder must pay $500 toward the repairs before the insurance company covers the other $500.

Share |

Have A Question About This Topic?

Thank you! Oops!
 

Related Content

Money Matters: Why it Pays to be Financially Responsible

Money Matters: Why it Pays to be Financially Responsible

Responsible money management is often a foreign concept to teens that is complicated and confusing. Yet, if they learn how to save and be financially responsible early, they can protect themselves in the future.

Ask a Financial Professional: I Got a Big Raise. Now What?

Ask a Financial Professional: I Got a Big Raise. Now What?

You got a pay raise – what should you do with it? Find tips on how to avoid tax surprises and lifestyle creep, and why paying

Financial Hacks for Millennials: The Great Wealth Transfer

Financial Hacks for Millennials: The Great Wealth Transfer

Have you heard of the Great Wealth Transfer? If you’re a millennial, it will likely be of particular interest to you, as it may involve an inheritance coming your way. But do you know how you would handle a large influx of money? How millennials manage their wealth in the coming years will play a large role In achieving financial confidence.